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Storms Lando, Mina and Nonoy: 3 Typhoons set to lash on RP


MANILA, NOVEMBER 27, 2007 (STAR) THE FREEMAN - By Jasmin R. Uy, Staff

The Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, Astronomical Services
Administration (PAGASA) said that more bad weather will be experienced
around the country as three tropical storms continue to linger around
the Philippines Area of Responsibility.

PAGASA-Mactan Chief Oscar Tabada said the meeting of the three
weather disturbances — typhoon Mina, tropical storm Lando, and a low pressure
area that might develop into a tropical depression named Nonoy – may
happen on Thursday.

Tabada said tropical storm Lando has been pulled back by Typhoon Mina
which is why it is expected to re-enter the Philippine Area of Responsibility.

Tabada explained that the attraction of “Lando” towards “Mina” is called
the “Fujiwhara effect, a case wherein a stronger weather disturbance is
affecting the lower one.

The Fujiwhara effect describes the rotation of two storms around each
other. It’s most common with tropical cyclones such as typhoons or
hurricanes, but also occurs in other cases. The effect is thought to
occur when storms get about 1,500 kilometers.

“Mina” is more dominant, she is the stronger typhoon. It’s
always like that in the Fujiwhara effect. If the dominant typhoon turns, the other
will move too. Upon crossing Northern Luzon, “Mina” is expected to
do a U-turn, and “Lando” will also move.

Lando, which exited the PAR last week, may reenter through Palawan
and Nonoy may enter the PAR through the Visayas region.Tabada said Lando
has again developed into a tropical storm, packing maximum sustained winds
of 95 kilometers per hour.

If Cebu will be on Lando’s path, Tabada said that they cannot yet
tell whether Lando will still hit the metropolis.

“Wala man nay dalan ang bagyo however, we should not feel relaxed
about it because it might hit the city,” Tabada said.

Tabada said that according to their forecast, Lando will enter
Palawan and will pass through Mindoro.

Mina on the other hand,is expected to move to the vicinity of Laoag
City, Ilocos Norte and Basco, Batanes on Tuesday morning and will be
felt in the province of Batanes until Thursday.

Nonoy on the other hand has not yet entered the PAR but is expected
to hit the country Thursday, according to the Tabada.


Mina’s Wrath

  Typhoon Mina slammed into the northeastern Philippines after killing
at least eight people in other parts of the country. Mina roared into the
coastal town of Palanan in Isabela province late Sunday, its sustained
wind weakening but remaining dangerous at 120 kilometers per hour with
gusts of up to 150 kph, chief government forecaster Nathaniel Cruz
said.After hitting land, it veered toward the country’s mountainous
northern provinces, where authorities evacuated thousands of people due
to fears of landslides.The typhoon flooded at least 50 villages in
Isabela, a province of more than a million people. A swollen river in the
provincial capital, Ilagan, engulfed at least 10 houses, whose residents fled to
safety late Sunday, officials said, adding that most of Isabela had no
power.In its report dated Monday noon, the National Disaster
Coordinating Council (NDCC) said seven of the eight fatalities were from Camarines
Sur while one was from Camarines Norte. The two missing were from Apayao
province.However, it said there are still no reports of casualties in
Cagayan Valley, where Mina made landfall before midnight Sunday. The
NDCC also said at least 30,844 families or 141,863 persons have been
evacuated to 21 evacuation centers as of Monday noon.It said these include 284
families or 1,110 persons in 14 evacuation centers in Cagayan Valley;
and 5,676 families or 28,355 persons in Catanduanes.In nearby Cagayan
province, two villagers drowned Sunday. Strong winds toppled trees and
knocked down power posts, cutting off electricity in the province of
nearly a million, Gov. Alvaro Antonio said. The province’s rice
industry suffered losses.‘’We were just one or two weeks away from harvest
time. I’m afraid we’ve lost everything to the flood and strong winds,’’
Antonio told The Associated Press by telephone.The Agriculture Department
estimated losses at over P100 million, which is just a fraction of the billions
of pesos in damages wrought by storms last year.

A landslide covered a road in the resort town of Pagudpud, in
northern Ilocos Norte province, late Sunday, blocking buses and cars, but
apparently causing no injuries. Troops were deployed to clear the road,
army Maj. Gen. Melchor Dilodilo said.Classes were suspended in several
provinces, partly because some were used to shelter evacuees, officials

said.Among the eight dead, five people drowned and another was
electrocuted over the weekend in southeastern Camarines Sur province,
Health Secretary Francisco Duque III said.Mina has been the most
erratic of the 13 typhoons and major storms that have hit the Philippines this
year. It first headed for the populous Bicol region, where more than
250,000 people were evacuated, but shifted Saturday to the north.As
authorities scrambled to shift their focus to the northern provinces of
Isabela, Aurora and Cagayan, forecasters said a typhoon that killed 14
people in the Philippines last week before heading for Vietnam had
reversed direction.— with reports from AP, GMANews.TV

Typhoon ‘Lando’ makes U-turn, lashes Palawan

By Helen Flores Tuesday, November 27, 2007
Tropical storm “Lando” (international name Hagibis) reentered the
Philippines yesterday, threatening Palawan and southern Luzon
provinces, weather forecasters said.

As a new wave of devastation looms with Lando’s return, disaster
officials spoke of ravages inflicted by typhoon “Mina” (international name
Mitag) on northeastern Luzon, particularly Isabela. Mina killed at
least eight people in the Bicol region.

Mina roared into the coastal town of Palanan in Isabela late Sunday,
its sustained winds weakening but remaining dangerous at 120 kilometers per
hour with gusts of up to 150 kph, Nathaniel Cruz, chief forecaster of
the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services
Administration (Pagasa) said.

The typhoon flooded at least 50 villages in Isabela, a province of
more than a million people. A swollen river in the provincial capital Ilagan
swept away at least 10 houses late Sunday and knocked off power in most
of the province.

The devastation prompted the communist New People’s Army to declare
an indefinite ceasefire in affected areas to give way to relief and rescue
operations. The military offensive against rebel groups has been suspended
since Saturday.

The ceasefire, an NPA statement said, “was a matter of policy,
whether or not the government and its armed forces issue a similar
declaration.”

Meanwhile, two villagers drowned Sunday in nearby Cagayan valley
where strong winds toppled trees and knocked down power posts. Gov. Alvaro
Antonio said the province’s rice industry suffered heavily.

“We were just one or two weeks away from harvest time. I’m afraid
we’ve lost everything to the flood and strong winds,” Antonio said.

“I’ve never experienced a typhoon this strong. My house shuddered
because of the strong winds and I thought it would crumble,” said
Janet Castillo, 26, a mother of three from Solana, Cagayan.

In Rizal, Cagayan, a woman was missing after she was swept away by
strong river currents yesterday.

In Ilocos Norte, a landslide covered a road in the resort town of
Pagudpud, blocking buses and cars but apparently causing no injuries.
Troops were deployed to clear the road, army Maj. Gen. Melchor Dilodilo
said.

Classes were suspended in several provinces, partly because some
classrooms were used to shelter evacuees, officials said.

In Pangasinan, two firemen in Sta. Maria died of electrocution while
they were installing a television antenna near the fire station at the
height of the typhoon. Fire Officer 1 Allan Wendell Bautista and FO2
Edwin Gonzales died instantly when they accidentally touched a high-tension
wire.

The eight officially listed as dead included five who drowned and
another who was electrocuted over the weekend in Camarines Sur
province, Health Secretary Francisco Duque said.

In Conner town in Apayao, Felipe and Reiner Abawag went missing after
the swollen Conner River swept away their house yesterday morning, the
Office of Civil Defense in the Cordillera said.

Mina has been the most erratic of the 13 typhoons and major storms
that have hit the Philippines this year. It first headed for the populous
Bicol region, where more than 250,000 people were evacuated, but shifted
Saturday to the north.

Pagasa director Prisco Nilo earlier said Mina pulled Lando back to
the country while the storm was on its way to Vietnam. He said the weather
phenomenon is called the “Fujiwara effect.”

Nilo said this phenomenon happens when a stronger storm directs the
movement of a weaker storm.

As of 4 p.m. yesterday, Lando continued to move east-northeast
towards northern Palawan-Mindoro area.

It was last spotted at 300 kilometers west-northwest of Puerto
Princesa City, packing winds of 75 kilometers per hour near the center and
gustiness of up to 90 kph. It was forecast to move east-northeast at 15 kph.

Storm signal no. 2 was hoisted over northern Palawan and Calamian
Group of Islands.

Signal no. 1 was up in Oriental Mindoro, Occidental Mindoro, Lubang
Island, Romblon, the rest of Palawan and Cuyo Island.

Lando is forecast to be at 140 kms west-northwest of Coron, Palawan
this afternoon; 60 kms north of Alabat, Quezon tomorrow afternoon; and at
210 kms east of Casiguran, Aurora tomorrow afternoon.

Meanwhile, as of 4 p.m. yesterday, Mina was spotted at 100 kms north
of Laoag City, packing winds of 110 kph near the center and gustiness of
up to 140 kph. It was forecast to move north-northeast at 11 kph.

Pagasa raised public storm warning signal no. 3 over Cagayan,
Kalinga, Apayao, Abra, Ilocos Norte, Babuyan Group of Islands, and the Batanes
Group of Islands.

Signal no. 2 was up in Isabela, Ifugao, Mt. Province, Benguet, La
Union, and Ilocos Sur.

Signal no. 1 was hoisted over Aurora, Quirino, Nueva Ecija, Nueva
Vizcaya, Tarlac and Pangasinan.

Meanwhile, Senate President Manuel Villar filed Senate Bill 1916
seeking to modernize Pagasa.

“We have more reasons to modernize because our country is
considered a typhoon belt, aside from the fact that we are an agriculture
country,” Villar said.

“It is highly imperative that we contemplate farmers’ welfare by
giving them accurate weather information for their own protection,” he said
in his explanatory note on the proposed measure.

Ready for Lando

The National Disaster Coordinating Council (NDCC) said it is prepared
for a new onslaught of Lando.

“We are as ready as we can be,” NDCC’s Office of Civil Defense
chief Anthony Golez told a news conference at Camp Aguinaldo.

He said that all regional and provincial disaster units in areas in
Lando’s path, especially Palawan, Mindoro, Quezon and Bicol, are on
full disaster alert. Relief goods and medical supplies have been
“pre-positioned” in critical areas ahead of Lando’s expected
landfall, said Golez.

From Palawan, “Lando would be passing Mindoro Island, the southern
portion of Quezon province and Camarines Norte,” Department of
Science and Technology Undersecretary Graciano Yumul said.

Malampaya Plant officials also assured NDCC of its readiness in the
face of Lando’s reentry.

Yumul said Lando will be over the Philippine Sea by Thursday, where
it will merge with another tropical depression Nonoy.

NDCC placed the damage left by Lando and Mina to agriculture and
infrastructure at P109.6 million.

Yumul said the typhoon knocked off the services of mobile phone
provider Smart in Palanan, Isabela, and in Diapigue, Aurora, he said.

Mina and Lando affected a total of 88,317 families or 399,033 persons
from 827 barangays in Northern and Central Luzon, Southern Tagalog and
Bicol region, according to NDCC.

There are still 30,844 evacuees in evacuation centers, the NDCC
reported.

Duque has extended to Nov. 30 the DOH measles immunization campaign
to reach out to those displaced by Lando and Mina. – Eva Visperas, Cet
Dematera, Edu Punay, Cesar Ramirez, Charlie Lagasca, Jun Elias, Sheila
Crisostomo, Manny Galvez, Christina Mendez, Jaime Laude, AP

More information on the Typhoons at:
- http://202.90.128.200/wb/tcupdate.shtml
- http://www.ssd.noaa.gov/PS/TROP/mtsatfloat1.html
- MayBagyo.com
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Chief News Editor: Sol Jose Vanzi

© Copyright, 2007 by PHILIPPINE HEADLINE NEWS ONLINE
All rights reserved

Images by Digital-typhonn.org

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